Thursday, 5 April 2012

Red Flowering Plants

Red Flowering Plants Biography
Jatropha is a genus of approximately 175 succulent plants, shrubs and trees (some are deciduous, like Jatropha curcas), from the family Euphorbiaceae. The name is derived from the Greek words ἰατρός (iatros), meaning "physician," and τροφή (trophe), meaning "nutrition," hence the common name physic nut. Mature plants produce separate male and female flowers. As with many members of the family Euphorbiaceae, Jatropha contains compounds that are highly toxic.In 2007 Goldman Sachs cited Jatropha curcas as one of the best candidates for future biodiesel production.It is resistant to drought and pests, and produces seeds containing 27-40% oil, averaging 34.4%.[4] The remaining press cake of jatropha seeds after oil extraction could also be considered for energy production.[5] However, despite their abundance and use as oil and reclamation plants, none of the Jatropha species have been properly domesticated and, as a result, their productivity is variable, and the long-term impact of their large-scale use on soil quality and the environment is unknown.Igbinosa and colleagues (2009) demonstrated potential broad spectrum antimicrobial activity of J. curcas.The stems of haat (Jatropha cuneata) are used for basketmaking by the Seri people in Sonora, Mexico. The stems are roasted, split and soaked through an elaborate process. The reddish dye that is often used is made from the root of another plant species, Krameria grayi. Spicy jatropha (J. integerrima) is cultivated as an ornamental in the tropics for its continuously blooming crimson flowers. Buddha belly plant (J. podagrica) was used to tan leather and produce a red dye in Mexico and the southwestern United States. It is also used as a house plant.
Red Flowering Plants
 Red Flowering Plants
 Red Flowering Plants
 Red Flowering Plants
 Red Flowering Plants
 Red Flowering Plants
 Red Flowering Plants
 Red Flowering Plants
 Red Flowering Plants
Euphorbia With Small Red Flower-(Plant No.3)
Red Flowering Plant 1

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